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Best Makeup Colours Bright Spring

The Great Courses description for Skepticism 101: How to Think like a Scientist reads,

…we are all vulnerable to believing things without using logic or having proper evidence – and it doesn’t matter how educated or well read we are. Our brains seem to be hard-wired to have our beliefs come first and explanations for our beliefs second.

Cliches in colour analysis are becoming outdated. High time too since women have known them to be fallible since they first reached a wide audience 25 years ago. Brown eyes have to be Winter, Springs are light, Brights have some kind of alien eyes that you could pick out anywhere, Autumns have red hair, are beliefs that simply do not hold true when measured across groups of people.

Bright Spring colouring has contributed much to this worthwhile end. It is stereotype-proof. It cannot be pinned down to any mold, standard, or convention. This colouring can appear similar to Light Summer or Dark Autumn commonly,  True Winter, Bright Winter, Soft Summer, and True Summer often, and even True and Soft Autumn sometimes.

Draping

Soft Summer? Bright Spring is easily confused with Soft Summer? How could that be? Forget about the fact that they are across from each other on a map. Maps are an over-simplified, narrow angle lens on a complex physical entity. A map of a territory is a piece of paper, not mountains and rivers. A colour cycle is an idea, not a human face. Maps are little pictures of a few relationships among many. Not for a moment do they encompass an entire topic.

Clients often ask how colour analysts make the decisions that they do. Well, that would be like asking your doctor the same thing. Without training in the legal profession, or whatever field, nobody can understand the decision-making process. Colour analysis has been made to appear DIY in the past. Although a wild fallacy, it served the purpose of popularizing a product that improves lives.

We can read books and join online groups till the end of time. These will not provide the answers to how colour analysts make decisions. They are entertainments, albeit good ones. We need to be shown person to person. Maybe one day, we can meet for Colour Retreats in your city. We’ll show you exactly how and why it is done as it is without the commitment of becoming an analyst yourself. We can meet for a 6AM walk, eat kale twice a day, have my delightful 15 ingredient smoothie for lunch, have guest speakers to talk about women&money, women&relationships. Oh, the possibilities!

Back to Bright Spring and Soft Summer. Think about what the two Seasons have in common. Quite a lot, actually. Allow me to walk you through a client draping. She might turn out Bright Spring or Soft Summer but we don’t know which one.

In the first comparison, both Seasons find some things to like about black. The analyst cannot know what this is at the beginning. All they see is that both colourings improve somehow. At the end, we will understand that the Soft Summer wanted the darkness. Bright Spring wanted the saturation. For now, that level of explanation is not available to us. All we know is that if the woman had $1000 and could only buy one dress between Winter black and Autumn brown, we would give her the black.

Several steps on, we compare the True Seasons. Either person might look quite good in True Summer if the comparison of the moment is with True Winter. Spring and Summer enjoy the lightness and the delicacy. True Winter can look a little heavy and rugged. The decision the analyst, or anyone, makes about a colour is completely contingent on which comparison her eyes are being given in that moment. Change the comparison, a different decision is made about the very same drape, which is why it is so essential to compare in many combinations. If a few of the Summer drapes happen to be very light, almost icy light, and not too muted, Bright Spring skin will play along. Soft Summer will be happy too since she is a Summer after all.

The Red Drapes are next, one the products of the great genius of Kathryn Kalisz, founder of the Sci\ART system. Neutral it is, for both Seasons. Soft Summer is a cool-neutral, meaning that it is even easier to switch it with Bright Winter than the warm-neutral Bright Spring. Not only is Bright Winter a cooler neutral, the overall darkness level is fairly close to Soft Summer. Bright Winter is a light Winter. Bright Spring is a dark Spring. Soft Summer is a dark Summer. In both value and heat dimensions, they all run together around the edges.

The analyst has to separate these Seasons on the saturation dimension as she plans her drape comparisons. Now what if the Bright Winter person is not the most saturated or darkest ever? One of those people who could live life (and would prefer to live life) in Light Summer? I could name several. What if the client is a Soft Summer whose colouring is fairly close to True Summer, meaning more saturated and cooler than the stereotypic/average Soft? Have seen several of those too.

For all Seasons, the average is rare. The stereotype might be 1 in 10. The vast majority of people are the disclaimer. You probably are.

Now we are moving on to the 12 Seasons drapes. Sometimes, the answer is obvious but life is not that easy and neither is colour analysis. Skin reactions must be seen, not verbally described. Both persons can have a fair bit of yellow in the eyes and many blues and greens. Bright Spring is generally a colour-activated person but Soft Summer is hardly colourless. Every human face is in perfect balance in its colours and its features.

We know that Bright Spring colours are only too bright when worn by another Season, but look quite normal and balanced on a Bright Spring. We know that Soft Summer colours can seem faded when worn by another colouring, but read as very vibrant when worn by a Soft Summer. So do Soft Summer eyes look quite bright in a Soft Summer face.

I sometimes wonder what it would be like to harmonize eye photos with the palettes. Nature colours a face in a harmony of Season colours, meaning that every face is normal, balanced, and vibrant. No living, healthy human wearing their natural colours has dull eyes.

Cosmetics

 

BestMakeupBrightSpringWeb



Winter is here. Red is necessary. Barbie pink and nectarine are not red enough.

Sometimes, this woman looks quite True Spring, with a lot of yellow in  the hair and general lightness about her. The only surface clue to a hint of Winter might be a golden brown eye or a spoke of rust in an aqua eye. She will wear the more orange colours beautifully while the bluer pinks may be too cool. The reverse is true also, that the very cool looking (or cool testing, meaning very near Bright Winter) woman will wear the cool pinks and darker red-violets.

The lightest to darkest colour spread, meaning the gray scale or the value scale, spans almost to black and white. That spread should be present in the made up face to express my idea of great makeup: take what you are and make more of it. The size of the area is not important as long as the eye of the viewer can see them at the same time.

Eyeliners are quite dark but not black. Dark gray is good on everyone. Many in this Season have an intensely red-orange colour in hair and eyes, like dark carrot. For them, the Season dark brown is lovely as liner, as it is on Asian dark eyes.

A coloured liner reads well because the person is so colourful to look at. Just be sure to match the colour, as green, turquoise, or purple, very carefully to your Colour Book. These colours can look juvenile if they stand apart from the face because the natural colouring could not find a home for it.

For all 12 Seasons, your white is a beautiful brow bone highlight. Here, it is a clear yellowed white, as buttermilk. We all know my love of peachy pink on Brights. Pale gold could be great, or silvery pink.

How to swatch makeup to Season was described in the Light Spring article.

Pinterest

I will post some thoughts on the Makeup for Your Natural Colouring board at Pinterest.

Products

Blush: Bare Escentuals Sweet Cheeks. Tarte Frisky. MAC Fleur Power, Pinch of Peach. Maybelline Dream Bouncy Hot Tamale. Nothing new and wonderful has crossed my path since these standbys.

Eyeshadow: Gosh Smoky Eyes #1 quad. EArden Graphite. Gosh Sand is a nice browbone highlight, warm pearly white. Gosh quad in Platinum has a good value range and could be used as is or to create many excellent colours.

Eyeliner: Clarins 04 Platinum. ELauder Graphite is darker, for those near Bright Winter. Gosh Hypnotic Grey is good, as is Raw Grey for the cooler, darker colouring.

Lipstick: Paulas Choice Strawberry Soda gloss. Becca Maraschino. Merle Norman Popsicle. Clarins Pink Fuchsia (might also be very good as a red option on True Spring) and Tropical Pink 19 as a warm pink.  Clinique stick Heftiest Hibiscus and Plushest Punch. Lancome RIL 163M appears in Light Summer’s post too, being quite saturated and of neutral heat, for those Bright Springs looking for a more natural lip. I showed a photo on the Pinterest board of how Barbie pink looks a little weak and flat. This colouring needs that pinch of red, which Gosh Lip Lacquer 900 could be used to add to other products.

 

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26 thoughts on “Best Makeup Colours Bright Spring”

  1. Too Faced Sweethearts Perfect Flush Blush in Candy Glow is a favorite of mine, because blush shows up on me very quickly. MAC Pink Swoon blush. LORAC Flaunt.

    Maybelline Olive Martini eye trio. Perfectly warmed grays with a bit of shimmer…sometimes matte on me just is not flattering. I also like NYX Love In Rio, Barefoot In The Sand trio. Such great taupe browns.

    Revlon Sorbet and Wild Watermelon lip butters. MAC Money Honey lip gloss. NYX Rose lipstick and NYX Louisiana, Wet and Wild 505A. Maybelline Shocking Coral.

    NYX Grey eye pencil, Prestige Charcoal, Prestige Aqua Force.

    The above are some of my personal favorites I find that work well on myself and are great harmonious matches to the BSp 12 Tones and Indigo Tones fans.

  2. Thank you Christine (and Tina) for lovely cosmetic choices :)
    I’ve been waiting for this post so long! Can’t wait to try them out. I love the eye make-up and blushes (always wore them bright but sheer cause no other colour showed on my skin as blush not weird/dirty stain) but the lips…

    I know BSp is suppose to be great in bright lips, which doesn’t overwhelm her face and when I look at photos – it really doesn’t stand out the way I thought it would. But in real life bright lipsticks don’t look like ‘no-make up’ at all. Only really sheer bright glosses, lip butters, balms give me natural appearance I like.

    Is there any other BSp who dislikes bright lipsticks? I don’t think lips are my best feature and don’t like them bright, cause it looks horrid when half-eaten (I tend to lick lips a lot). On daily bases I like to overdraw lips a little using flesh tone liner – so the lips appear bigger but doesn’t look like make-up and I don’t need to fix it 20 times a day. I don’t know should I fight this habit get myself into bright lips. Anyone had similar experience?

    Thanks for this Lancome lipstick Christine cause I was about to ask if I can “borrow” something from LSp darker shades for more natural effect, this will be my first choice. I like watermelon/strawberry shades of red which looks lighter, watered, more warm pink than red when it’s next to really dense red ones.

  3. I do much better with something sheer than I do with something opaque. Opaque bright colors are too much. Sheer or semi sheer bright colors are much more wearable. This can falsely lead to someone thinking they are a Light season when they really aren’t, if they find they cannot wear opaque makeup colors.

  4. Christine, I have your book and thank you for your post on Bright Spring cosmetics – specific shade names are greatly appreciated. I basically would be called a Bright or Vibrant Spring having had my PCA done by [another system], which revealed I’m 70% Lively Bright; 20% Striking Contrast; and 10% Earthy Rich.

    An interesting note is that bright pinks/fuchias are not in my personalized palette as those colors are not complimentary to my complexion. The other colors you’ve displayed are in my palette, including the warmer blush.

    I always look forward to reading your posts.

    Best wishes!!!

  5. @Daga, Truth Is Beauty has Burt’s Bees Hibiscus tinted lip balm listed for Bright Spring and it’s my go-to color for a natural, low key lip. It might be a bit too warm if you lean to the cooler end of the BS spectrum, though. I find that using it on both my lips, cheeks, and even a light wash in my eyelid crease gives a nice “natural” look that’s warm but not dull. I also find I can pull off the same monochrome look with peach and softer coral-pink shades. It ends up looking really pretty and delicate.

    I have dark brown hair, fair, lightly freckly skin, dark brows/lashes, and dark hazel eyes, just to give you an idea of my coloring. I’m high contrast, but lean just a little warm and the BS greens, blues, and corals seem to be my really great colors.

  6. Adding on about bright lipstick and sheer finishes. I find that I can only wear sheer lip gloss in bright colors such as Lancome’s Juicy Tubes. It gives me the right amount of color saturation, but with a sheer, glossy (not sparkly or frosty) finish.

    Although I am in my 50’s my skin is still quite shiny (not oily but sort of glassy) and I think women look best with lips that are as shiny or slightly shinier than their skin. I don’t think Bright Springs can pull off matte lipstick. I know it makes me look corpse-like even when the shade matches my swatch book.

    I know a lot of stylists argue that older women should never, ever wear lip gloss, but I think Bright Springs may be the exception. Am I correct?

  7. Yeah, the BrSp post is here! Thanks Christine.

    I agree with others that matte/opaque lipsticks seem too heavy, too glaring. Glosses and sheers are much better, I feel more comfortable, more natural.

    At age 60 I focus on skin care and don’t wear other makeup, lips only, so the shine of the glosses gives me the emphasis I want without being too prominent on my face.

    Pinks and cherry tones seem to work best, tried corals but they seemed all wrong even though I love to wear oranges and corals. I am using Paula’s Choice Liquid Lipstick in Watermelon Pink and PC Strawberry Soda Gloss for the summer, will switch to PCLL Cherry Red and Revlon Colorburst Lip Butter in Cherry Tart for fall and winter. (Unfortunately the PC LL are only available now and then as part of a promotion, they’re not sold separately.)

    I’ll definitely check out the recommended colours, thanks again.

  8. I’m so glad I’m not the only one :) Thanks for response. Tina, you nailed it – the matte/semi matte ones looked so opaque on me… I was starting to doubt my season thinking “and I’m suppose to be the brightest of them all?”

    Nice to discover variety among the same season. Like LauraH I also don’t care much for orange/coral on my face despite loving it in clothing. The exception is pink-coral which looks warm pink on my face although seems quite orange in box, better on cheeks than lips though.

    Monica, first of all you aren’t old, save that word for your 70′ :) My mother is in her mid 50′ and she looks better than 15 years ago, of course she wears lip gloss. She also rocks bright, matte orange-red lipstick which I can’t handle. There are more important things to think of than age when it comes to appearance – like colouring, body type/lines. If you get that good, very few things will be age inappropriate.

  9. Re: do all B Sp wear sheer colour, especially as lipstick, better than matte or opaque? There is no advice that applies to every woman in any Season. Not all Brights and Springs look great in dewy skin or makeup finishes. Some look terrific in matte lipstick. Many Summers look lovely in gloss and shine.
    I wonder if the answer has as much to do with the opinion of the viewer as the wearer. I like beautiful makeup that is not nearly invisible and doesn’t feel careful, especially on mature women. It’s the young ones who look overdone and silly much faster in definite makeup, which may be why they’re all going around looking ready to film a music video alongside Taylor Swift. That’s fine, it’s expected of them.
    For us in our 50s, pulling back can look tired, not young or fresh. With vibrant cosmetics, we look in the game, energized, vital. Our faces have the power to balance it. Once hair and complexion lose pigmentation, although the pigment that is there is the same colour it always was, being too careful and safe in makeup fades right in to what looks like a big gray circle of hair, clothes, face, etc. There is no excitement, no reaction, which I see over and over in mature women.

    Very important too is just your preference. My sis will never wear makeup, nor will many women. Some want only a light touch. That’s their right answer. Monica, only my taste, lips that are shinier than skin look great on everyone when the colour is right. I can’t come up with any Season or age group or skin colour where that wouldn’t apply. That said, some wear matte (I’d say semi-matte myself, I never really care for the dry look of a matte lip on anybody) extremely well, including B Sp. Maybe the degree of shine matters, where a S Su will look good in soft cotton skin and a semi-matte lip will look quite shiny next to that.

    We are often asked if image type dictates a certain type of makeup (Dramatic Classic (Yang Classic) wears smoky eyes and opaque lips, Dramatic wears matte lips, Natural wears sheers better, etc.). For me, although there’s truth in it that can apply to everyone to some degree, it is too regulated. It is not possible that every single YangC of all ages and colourings will wear the identical makeup application best. Many Ds would do well in shiny cosmetics, maybe used to carve the angles even further. ‘Smoky eyes and opaque lips’ is a particular cosmetic effect, but a woman could have many more than just that one. Those effects begin to feel too much like trends from magazine pages or the eccentricities of certain makeup artists, all of which are transient and only a small part of an overall picture. They’re trying to sell you a certain look, meaning it’s marketing, not the beauty and power of one single woman in control of her own appearance.

    About the fuchsia not fitting in with another system: no two PCA systems evaluate colouring in the same way, nor do they classify their palettes in the same way. Their fundamental beliefs about how humans are coloured are too different. The analyst’s opinion of what flattering means, what harmony means, and how these are translated to wardrobe all diverge significantly. Although a frustration to consumers, I believe it’s a good thing to get input from many sources. No one reference has every answer to anything in our lives. Colour consumers feel that they would love to have all of the systems in perfect accord for the simplicity, but it would be boring and limit the great ideas that different minds and visions could contribute. It’s rather like looking after our health. The more you read and discover, the more nuggets you isolate that apply well to you until one day, you have a lovely collection of many pages in a personal My Health – What Works For Me book. If I can find 75% or more in a single system that applies to every person I see, as I have with Sci\ART, I figure there’s a lot to like. Other systems still have lots to add, so the end result is a beautiful and unique picture all your own.

    (Jan, about the comment not appearing, the blog software holds them in moderation before they appear; usually, this is from people posting for the first time until it recognizes the incoming email, or if more than 2 posts appear from the same email in case it’s spam, with which websites are flooded despite many precautionary measures behind the scenes. I’ve deleted your other questions. Also, I’ve edited the name of the previous service you visited since I have received copyright violation notices from some image companies when their names are mentioned. That should not be a concern in reader comments whatsoever but I don’t want the headaches. At least they’re reading what we’re saying, right?)

  10. I’m wondering if anyone owns the Gosh makeup shades and could recommend good duplicates by brands available for purchase to the American public?

  11. Thank you, Christine, for your gracious reply. I always read your posts and answers with great enthusiasm.

  12. Erin, your comment didn’t appear before. Thanks, I’ll try it when I’ll have an occasion. My type of beauty is similar to yours but I have no freckles. I’m high in contrast mostly cause of my very pale skin since I’ve stopped tanning. I haven’t quite figured out which side I lean to and I’m still playing with my colours and image – for now I get the most compliments when I wear greens and blues. For a moment I thought that after PCA everything is “done” but it’s endless discovering.

    Christine, as often, you’ve answered my question in-advance. I was about to ask for your opinion on relationship between image type, make up and Seasons. I’m pretty sure I’m YinG and suppose be good wearing a lot of make-up, minimal should be ageing on me. It seems to be the opposite but not only there are personal differences but everything is very relative. My “no-makeup look” can be even a lot on other – to look fresh and natural I use all face products and bright colours – just rather sheer. I love what you said about women in their 50’s, never knew that my mother has an ability to pull of so much more than me, not despite but because of her age. I thought that it was only cause her type, I still don’t know much about image archetypes but she can only be Classic or Dramatic, T or B Sp. Due to many similarities I mostly compare to her, and next to her I feel very modest in make up and style, I think most people would :)

  13. Thank you Christine for the wonderful explanation about the “relationship” between Soft summer and BrS/BW – which I very much could relate to.
    About lipsticks, this is a recommendation coming from a BW, but some of you Bright Springs might have success with Clarins “Joli Rouge Brilliant series”.
    They are semitransparent lipsticks with pure colours. My favourite is 13 Cherry (oddly enough it tastes like strawberry). It is a bit weak now that I am used to my season, but it still is a very good everyday lipstick.

  14. I haven’t been able to find the Gosh shadows. Is there another mainstream line that could be substituted?

  15. I get many requests for Gosh and have never included them. Interesting, BSp was the last Season in which I found eyeshadow, and remains one of the most challenging. In my shopping, I came across no other colours that struck me as excellent. These were quite surprising. If you belong to one of the many Bright Spring groups on facebook and other sites like Pinterest, you may find many helpful suggestions.

  16. I get many requests for Gosh and have never included them. Interesting, BSp was the last Season in which I found eyeshadow, and remains one of the most challenging. In my shopping, I came across no other colours that struck me as excellent. These were quite surprising. If you belong to one of the many Bright Spring groups on facebook and other sites like Pinterest, you may find many helpful suggestions.

  17. Christine, I agree with you regarding finding eyeshadows for Bright Spring as they seem to be almost nonexistent.

    Would you be kind enough to let us know where we can purchase the Gosh brand? I’m not having any success in locating this line.

    Many thanks for sharing your knowledge.

  18. I’m not certain, Jan. It is certainly in Canada (Shoppers Drug Mart). I think it’s a Scandinavian brand. Maybe others will know.

  19. I used to be able to wear opaque red lips. It suited me very well but now I’m older it doesn’t flatter. I wear gloss instead but the colour is still bright.

  20. @ Erin and Daga, I’d recommend Burt’s Bees lip shimmer in Rhubarb for Bright Springs even more than the Hibiscus; at least
    for me, it gives the perfect “nude”, very natural look! I know that most others wouldn’t probably consider it “nude” at all (it’s kind of a dark warm pink), but on me it is. I do need a lot of colour , and if you’re a fellow Bright you probably do too :)
    (I’m a self-diagnosed Bright Spring, 99% sure I’ve got it right.)

  21. @Melina, I used to wear rhubarb years ago and I liked it but something felt off- most likely because I was probably wearing it with my typical Dark Autumn clothing/eye makeup, lol. I’ll have to give it another look.

    I just discovered a really nice BS everyday pink: Dr. Hauschka #16 Pink Topaz. My hubby thought it looked tacky in the tube, lol, but when I put it on, my coloring toned it down and it looked so pretty! It also felt great, texture-wise. It works well as a neutral pink that is kind of understated (at least by BS standards) but still bright enough to work on a Bright Spring.

  22. @Erin, yes, definitely give Rhubarb another try :) Though as for me, I’ve since my earlier post began to suspect I’m actually a BW, not BS (it’s overall a much better fit), so you might want to take that into account ;)

  23. Thank you Christine for that Gosh recommendations, I wouldn’t pick it up at the counter but it turned out one of the best eyeshadow colours I ever had!

    I finally found a bright, opaque lipstick I wear very comfortably – light, bright pinky-peachy coral (not muted, not pastel, not orange so still BSp I think, although it seems like a TSp/LSp choice). It matches my lips natural level of darkness (I’m overall pale). My problem with bright opaque/not sheer lipsticks is that most popular bright colours/recommendations seem to be too dark. Christine mentioned (post “When cosmetic recs don’t work…”) that high contrast person can wear wear bigger jumps from skin to lip colour than recommended and vice versa. I don’t think I’m lower in contrast than most of my Season, in fact due to paleness I’m quite high in contrast BUT lips darker than my own create a contrast higher than my own – making me look edgier than I am, more dramatic or just overly “done” and I’m not keen of any of that. Maybe it’s mostly a matter of taste but overall darkness can have something to do. BSprings can be women of colour as well as very pale like me – some changes for women at the both “ends” seem to be reasonable. In clothes it’s not an issue – I were all colours, but since I don’t wear any browns or purples from my fan on my lips… maybe I’m not meant to wear pinks darker than my lips as well.

    @Melina, the colour looks nice on some swatches, it could be too dark for me but worth to try, thanks for rec :)

  24. Oh man this answers so many questions about why I have been so Confused between such seemingly different color palattes. I did NOT understand how I could be a winter/spring and also seemingly fit into a summer/autumn category.
    Whew. I was able to settle on BSp because I CAN wear all the color and if I were a soft summer I wouldn’t be able to….
    I’m ready to embrace my colors and stop my month-long search.

  25. LOVING the Clinique Chubbies from these recs, thank you. They are amazing as an eye zinging instant face-lift with an otherwise bare face (mother of two tines here: full makeup is a rarity!) I am on the hunt for a concealer though, and would love to hear any BSp suggestions please. I’d been liking the texture & coverage of a bareMinerals powder foundation as an under eye concealer, but at my recent PCA we saw it was a slightly deadening colour for my complexion after all. Any ideas? I’m a fair, freckly BSp, pretty much in the middle of the Season.

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