Jackie and Annie Are Bright Winters

Jackie

 

Visible darkness, the eyes are near black, but how much darkness exactly? How near black?

Is that muted skin (Summer or Autumn) or sallow (a Winter)?

Is she sweet (Spring) or graceful (Summer)? She’s both if you know her. Who expected her to pull off so much drama?

In Jackie, are we finding Summer’s ‘quiet-till-you-know-her’ or Winter’s contained?

 

 

If I am completely uncertain beforehand, she’s usually a True Something or a Bright Spring. I’ve seen Jackie at her work many times. She chooses a lot of cool, muted colours, like a Soft Summer or any young woman in today’s retail offering. Sometimes she wears black, which clears, defines, and comes close to overpowering. No way she was warm enough for a Spring, even a Bright Spring. No doubt that the B&W of True Winter would be too sharp. I had never seen her wearing makeup.

In 12 Season (12 Tone) personal colour analysis, Bright Winter is the Neutral Season, or group of natural colouring, that takes most of its colour properties from Winter, with a small, but so important, contribution from Spring. When the two Tones of highest chroma come together in one person, our senses feel the hit of the purest pigments, offered in a most gentle presentation.

I didn’t imagine she would balance Bright Winter. A colour analyst has the same comparison-based sense of vision as everyone else. We can guess but we know how much money you will part with based on our advice. We don’t guess. We measure. She balanced it and then some. Her eyes were clean and crisp – what happens to part of the face happens to the whole face. It’s just that some features are better markers for it. If your eyes are clear, so is your skin. If their edges are clean, so are the rest of your features’.

Beginning with how a person looks, dark, light, etc. is only a little more secure than naming Season based on character. Especially the True Seasons. It takes a certain amount of guts to pronounce True with drapes, let alone without. Especially the True Spring and True     Winter. They never look like the averages. Those we think we know from media are usually very altered.

 

 

She couldn’t be Soft Summer. The connection that the black in the eyes made with Winter drapes was one thing. Only brown eyes in one of the 5 Winter-influenced Seasons will do that. Plus, just moving ideas around before the analysis, her character wasn’t right. The Softs are Brights are both gracious but contained. Soft Summer is steadier. She is thinking about keeping the ship on course, attending to the work of the day. She gave the analysis some thought and gathered a list of questions. She is going to get it right.

The Bright Seasons just show up for the experience. Winter thinks their way through it, Spring feels it. Brights are sparkly, not the first adjective you might think of for any Season on the Autumn side. Jackie is very sparkly once her right colours are near her, with the points of the sparkles in her nose, her chin. Anyone could have thought that was Summer’s doll-like face, small chin, beautifully shaped nose, but nobody can link character or facial features to colouring until the drapes find the truth of the colours. After that, a lot more starts to make sense.

Colorants remain pure in apparel and cosmetics for Bright Seasons because the native colours are pure. Saturation in dyes can go, and will go, as high as chemistry can take it, higher than Munsell saw back in his day. I have never seen the colour that can overpower this skin in purity. Darkness, yes. Chroma, no. Maybe if you wrap them in a neon tube, but I bet Bright Winter would just look better. Part of what sets them apart is the potential for extravagance that takes everyone by surprise, them most of all. Placing this skin in soft colour, meaning muted, meaning blued or pinked greys, meaning pastels, you wouldn’t do it if you’d watched what happens in real life with your own eyes. You’re looking at a face in a dirty mirror.

Colour saturation is extremely high in the Bright Seasons. Too often, we darken when we saturate colour in our imagination. The 3 Colour Scales (hue, value, chroma) are independent, meaning that when a colour is altered, the other colour dimensions are necessarily affected, just not necessarily in the same way. Bright Winter has higher chroma (more saturation, pure pigments), higher value (lighter), and warmer hue than the other Winters. One could argue that theoretically, the overall value is mid range and the range reaching fully to B&W, so the same as True Winter. It is hard to accurately judge value when colours have different saturations and/or hues. My eyes think they see Bright as lighter than True, just because the yellow in the Bright palette looks lighter.

 

 

I look for colours with incredible pigment purity and yet, some transparency. Coloured crystals, coloured glass. Jackie was too comfortable with Clinique Kissyfit lipgloss, magnificent that it was. I want you a little uncomfortable, especially Winters who don’t like to give up control. Many are pretty sure that they know their own best presentation better than anyone else (more Darks and Trues than Brights). They come in telling me they already have their best hair colour and they won’t wear pink or orange. In truth, they see themselves accurately to the exact same degree as anyone else, which is to say, maybe 50-50. Jackie had the perfect mindset. She wouldn’t put her foot on the brakes no matter what. She could see her appearance getting better and better and she just went with it. A little nervous? Maybe. Did it anyway.

I’ll keep adding till we push open those doors. As you know if I’ve put makeup on you, I’m not stingy or careful with the amount. I want you to see right colour fuse with your face and to give you balance. Never get in the way of your own glamour. Of your own anything. We moved on to Tarte Nuria gloss. Jackie could see that it was a lot more than she’s used to, but she couldn’t look away or say that it did not look superb. Each building block of makeup on a Winter looks like too much on its own. You need it all to balance. Eyes with this intensity need a mouth with something going on, or the face is off kilter.

We used a charcoal liner and lots of it and L’Oreal Blackened Smokes eyeshadows. Pulling the dark sparkly black shadow over the grey liner was magic. Black mascara. I’m coming to notice that Bright Winter often has ridiculously gorgeous eyelashes.

Lighting is variable in these photos and many are taken in a mirror. The colours may not be what you expect for Bright Winter. These photos have gone through four digital machines before you see them. Besides, they are surrounded by too many other colours and uncontrolled lighting to know what they really are. To know the truth of a colour, it must be surrounded by neutral gray. The walls of the room are painted neutral gray but they sure don’t look it, do they? Correct colour analysis requires neutral surroundings. For me, that’s the first non-negotiable standard.

 

 

I believe that the best beauty is the easiest for others to see. The minute something doesn’t fit, we feel it in our gut. The person has altered themselves, as if they couldn’t trust themselves the way they were. If they couldn’t, should we? People are more relaxed and honest with us if our appearance speaks the truth of us.

The beautiful girl in these pictures is at ease with herself. Jackie is easy easy for us to look at. She’s wearing lots of makeup but the colours feel like an effortless, natural part of her face. Most important, her expression shows us that Jackie feels happy and calm. We, in turn, feel happy and calm. Humans are highly empathic, women especially.

What I want to give you is what Jackie has in these photos, a feeling of being fully satisfied and grateful with what she was given, of knowing that her gifts are perfect, plenty, and enough for anything she chooses to do. I love to analyze young women so they can experience this no-turning back moment. May they carry it for a lifetime and never fill a makeup bag with colours made for anyone but their own true selves.

 

 

Annie

I am thrilled when I meet women who present themselves as they are. I have a lot of respect for the fact that when we meet, clients are without their makeup. I am given the enormous privilege of a blank slate and the permission to take it where I see the most genuine beauty. Some women don’t wear makeup and never will, and that’s fine as long as the decision is made from consciousness or hope, anything but fear (and if it’s fear, I will help you).

What happens when a woman loves sweats and denim jackets, sees herself as a student, say, or scientist, not a bombshell, dresses in Summer’s colours, and finds out in one short afternoon that she is a Bright Winter?

Annie is a stunning, and I mean stunning, Bright Winter with medium brown hair and aqua turquoise eyes. Big similarities to Sophie Ellis-Bextor, with a little lighter hair colour (see the hair colour photo in next section). Annie works and studies, loves her jeans, runners, and hoodie, and has all her gear in a backpack.

Like Jackie, she found it hard to look away from her face in lovely makeup and her own, perfect colours. Once she got back home, it came to her that she wasn’t at all sure she wants to go around being stunning. Annie is discovering what many of us have, that being noticed for our great beauty surprises us by being awkward. We get over that. Then we have to put our clothes together.

She read all the adjectives about energized, dynamic, and sharp, thought about the Snow Princess analogies and heard this. It’s too loud. Bright Winter is not brash. No Season is. Each one finds a balance. The darker, the quieter. The bolder, the more minimalist. The purer, the more crystalline. The brighter, the sweeter.

 

Photo: ilco

 

This is too hard. Close in many ways, beautiful and powerful face,

 

Photo: african_fi

 

Both of those forgot two very important elements that have to show up together: delicate (missing above) and happy (missing below).

 

In the meantime, Annie  just wants to be this. Also beautiful, but Annie looks like this about as much Sophie E-B. There are aspects that are right but it’s probably not the best fit.

 

Photo: Daphne01

 

Some of these are personal adjustments, as Annie feels her way to being at home in brighter colours. I recall going in to work my first day after my adjustment, thinking everyone would notice and comment. Nobody said a word. We move into our new direction too slowly for others to really pick up on it, but to us on the inside, those first few steps feel almost earth-shattering.

But also, Annie is right in that Bright Winter walks a fine line. To say Snow Princess and leave it at that emphasizes the cold, the regal, all true, may be easier if you have Nordic genes, but forgets Spring’s melt. The Bright Seasons are a world coming alive, fresh and young, the activity of life great and small on the forest floor, in the trees, and in the fields. The lid is still on, this is still Winter, and now getting ready to fire on all cylinders. That building up is the stored energy of Bright Winter, the flash of a yellow silk tank or lining in a dark tuxedo.

The contradiction of Bright Winter is in how it will fire: as babies, with all their innocence disguising a powerful intention to live. When we choose clothes, we want that element of extreme youth, even before birth, earliest dawn. Baby colours on Winter’s dark background. Sounds of bells when the sun comes up. A jeweled silver locket. Dangling crystal earrings. A thin, shiny, sugarplum belt. Yoga pants with a line of sequins down the leg. A pink scarf with gold and silver metallic threads. Sun is still an afterthought in the early hours. Like a child’s tiara, it doesn’t have to be big and heavy. Accessories are a great way to bring your energy closer and keep the detachment you need to not feel threatened while you absorb it.

The image below is closer to Bright Spring. They still have Winter’s darker reserve but it sneaks away from them. Many more giggles. Fireworks are delicate and temporary, true of all Spring, but there’s too much movement for Winter.

Photo: enbo62

 

This is better. The feeling is not so much delicate as fragile. It is delicate as intricate. The colours are the same. The faces too.

 

Photo: ilco

 

Need not be complicated or expensive. Need not be a big area. We see small areas just as well. A bright pink tank top with a little pink sequin detail, an ice grey hoodie in an athletic knit instead of sweatpants fleece, dark jeans, runners with a turquoise swoosh, little diamond earrings for $7, and a backpack with a red zipper.

I can’t think of a store that does inspired style with a big nod to adorable better than J. Crew. Search the Women’s page. Icy boatneck tees, an awesome handknit mixed media sweater, bright cashmere…but these girls aren’t done up and fancy. They’re not Ice Anything. Somehow they still look a little special. They’re uncommonly accessorized. Kate Spade has sweetness too, but usually too perky for a Winter. Is Crew too safe? Maybe so, but by the time these women reach their 40s, they’ll be ready to pull out more stops.

What we do is just proof in the physical world of what we believe. We cannot change our beliefs instantly, regardless of how strong the argument and the evidence. We live through that shape shifting time when we saw one thing, we consciously know it’s true, but everything else is catching up.

Give yourself the time. Invisibility was a kind of superpower in its own right, just maybe not the one you want for the rest of your life if you really think about it. Once you’ve seen yourself in your best colours, going back to invisibility feels like letting yourself down. You feel your way into your new colours over a few months. You have time to wonder, This is just clothes. Why is this affecting me so much? You’re doing this for you, always the hardest person to convince. Once we believe in us, everyone says, What took you so long?

Tea and Coffee Hair

Bright Season hair is uncommon. It’s glassy. It’s lighter than True Winter in many cases. The mistake is made of assuming it’s light to medium brown because what else are we going to call it? Wearing wrong colour, it can appear to have the dusty quality of Summer ash brown. Once the colours of clothing are adjusted, your hair looks as different, improved, and cleared, as your face.

Bright Season hair is never ash. If I were a hair colourist, I might know how to create it, or maybe it can’t be done. I have never seen it improved by hair colour. The colour is always too dense and heavy. Maybe it’s because the hair colour industry’s way of making choices for women is broken, not the fault of the stylists who are the nicest people. Maybe because Brights should just leave their hair alone. Colour chemistry hasn’t caught up with the specialness of it. I do wonder about Laminates though. They may have a place, as coloured cellophane, consistent with hair that is basically already that.

I’ve likened Bright Season hair colour to tea and Autumn-influenced hair to coffee. Bright Season hair is not only lighter in colour, the colour is lighter in density.

Annie’s hair, Earl Grey Tea with lemon in it.

 

Jackie’s hair:

 

 

Dont mess with this hair. This is not medium brown hair. It’s magic.

Often, a Bright Season tip-off is hair that is not as dark as eyes, when eyes go to black. Not always. Asian people often have hair and eyes of equal darkness. We have another Bright Winter article coming with hair that is as dark. We’ll show you root beer and black tea.

 

What are your thoughts about Eva Green of James Bond’s Casino Royale, here and here?

Here is one reality.

Another.

Many aspects of her face remind me of Jackie’s. The shapes of the eyes and smile particularly.

Who knows what’s real? Are the freckles? The hair colour? But what colouring.

 

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Use of Images

The images contained in this article are of private individuals, not celebrities. I consider the permission for me to use them as a privilege. It is my intention to protect these women’s privacy and generosity. If you use any of the photos without permission, I will seek legal counsel. I do not want to have to reduce the beauty and detail of the photographs with watermarks.

This is a learning site. You are free to use any of my words so long as they are attributed back to the page you got them from (meaning entire URL, not just the site name), in every instance of their use. If you mix up my meaning and get the message wrong, feel free to omit any reference back to me.

36 thoughts on “Jackie and Annie Are Bright Winters”

  1. Oh, how I wish I were a bright winter! I think Eva Green is more of a Bright or True Spring. Her natural hair color is dirty blonde, and I find the strong makeup and heavy fabrics she favors often overpower her. She has the personality of a Winter though, and pulls it off quite well. This is her as a child (admittedly before she grew into her season):

    http://evagaellegreen.tumblr.com/post/833479632

  2. The hair thing: I suspect I’m a bright something, and I color my hair. I know I’m supposed to embrace my nature-given haircolor, but I’m not ready to embrace the grays. A light, neutral-to-warm brown does the least amount of damage, but I know what you mean about colored hair on brights often looking muddy or heavy. I found a great picture of my best hair color at age thirteen: light brown, not really highlighted, but sunlit, if that makes sense. And yes, it’s impossible to recreate.

  3. Thankyou again Christine. Your correlation between the BW and Kibbe’s TR type made me look carefully again at my Kibbe and yes indeed I am forced to admit my increasing suspicions that I am a TR (carrying extra weight) and not the softer R I had decided upon. It takes a fair amount of courage to dress as your true self as a BW TR (especially in the sun and surf climate I’ve lived in all my life) but what a liberation once you get there! XX

  4. Really enjoyed this article, thank you Christine. I can see Eva as a bright. Incidentally, I also wondered about JoBeth Williams and Jennifer Connelly as brights (JoBeth possibly Spring)…?

  5. Christine,

    What bright and absolutely stunning women! Annie’s hair is Earl Grey with lemon–no better way to describe it. Jackie’s hair is complete magic too. So are their smiles, skin, and hair. Truly beautiful harmony!

    Just an aside for this post but I have to say it: I find your work fascinating. On your recommendation, I’m reading “Vision and Art” like a textbook and it’s captivating. I look at colors (ahem, “colours”) and shapes and undertones completely differently since I started reading 12blueprints three (?) years ago. BTW, The Teaching Company has a few good neuroscience courses, one great one on the science of shapes, and–most importantly–one on human perception, http://www.thegreatcourses.com/tgc/courses/course_detail.aspx?cid=1674. (I have no PCA training, and I certainly don’t have your talented, honed eyes or brain! I’m sure these are too basic for you, but they’ve been fascinating to me.)

    I still miss your voice on A Greener Tea. (I’m out of non-boring workout DVDs and smoothie recipes!) But I admire and appreciate your honest voice and impressive expertise on 12blueprints immensely. I hate that this sounds so sappy and saccharine, but it’s true. I can’t say that any other blog has changed the way I look at the world.

    Amy

  6. Excellent article! The Bright seasons seems to be tricky… I find particularly hard to distinguish between BW and LSu, both have a hint of Spring, are cool and LSu can go surprisingly clear so where are the limits? I’m wondering myself if I’m a BW or LSu because I can’t get draped where I live (Barcelona) and I find it almost impossible! My only clue is that I can put a lot of make up, especially eyeshadow and look like if I’m wearing nothing. There’s only one condition: not going too dark (dark eyeshadow + dark blush + dark lips = gothic princess!). Maybe being a TR is another clue ;)
    I liked the correlation between color analysis and Kibbe, I can see Eva Green as a Theatrical Romantic: she is delicate, curvy, with a waspish waist and some sharp edges… altough she don’t seem petite!. And I can see her as a BW too. Sometimes she looks softer but… she looks gorgeous on sapphire and purple! Sadly, she seems firmly resolved to dress like a Deep Winter ;-P

  7. Now I have a better idea of Bright hair! I don’t think Eva Green was necessarily a “dirty blonde” as a child–in the childhood photo her hair looks so glossy it could be much darker than it appears in that light. The photos of Jackie, and especially of Annie’s hair, remind me of an old novel, GREEN MANSIONS, that was made into a movie with Audrey Hepburn as Rima the Bird-Girl. In the novel, Rima’s hair is described as so fine and glossy that in sunlight it looks white and in shade it looks near black. Annie’s hair has a rosy tinge on my monitor–in any case it’s clearly high-gloss hair. I agree with you, Christine, about Bright hair. Why color it when it’s already magic?

  8. Hi, I was analyzed as a bright winter. Your comments about hair ring true. My hairdresser tells me that she considers everyone a candidate for coloring, but that there’s no way to improve my hair. She seems a little befuddled by it. Except, one day I went in wearing soft summer colors, and her first comment was “Maybe we should start thinking about coloring your hair!”

  9. Yet another brilliant article, Christine!

    I’m a bright spring and a close friend has recently been diagnosed as a Winter (in 4 seasons), probably a bright winter and everything you say here rings so true.

    Your description of brights’ hair is almost uncannily accurate. I spent years trying to get to grips with the colour as it never seemed dark or light enough but it was very very shiny and like you say, strangely glasslike. I’ve only really appreciated its natural colour and texture since being PCAd.

    Thank you!

  10. Is there a bright or true spring equivalent to the dark green drape? Something not quite as blue or dark? I’ve noticed that dark, clear, slightly yellowed greens make my eyes look something other than brown — more amber-y or golden.

  11. What do you think about the best skin finish on Bright Winters? Love “glass” for bright spring.

  12. I don´t know if I am a Bright, a Soft, or any other season, but this article makes me think about my own hair (when it wasn´t chemically altered). In Summery colors it looks ashy, and I used to think this was a clue I could be a Summer. But with strong blues it looks a little reddish, not really an auburn tone but with a little of that. And when I wore a yellow so-yellow-it-can´t-be-another-color, the hair suddenly look rich, dark (darker than I expected) and intense, not mousy. May be it is Bright Hair? Or all these changes are a sign of Softness instead?

  13. Anna – thank you for the photo of young Eva. I agree that she seems more Spring, but has some Winter details in her composition.

    Kate – I’ve often wondered if Connelly is a BW actually. And I see where you’re going with JoBeth as a BSp. Very possible.

    D – Softness or clarity? who knows? that’s why we don’t use hair to analyze colour…even with drapes, hair just doesn’t tell the story like skin does.

    Thank you so much to all of you for your comments. I treasure the community that we have here. It came to me recently that I would never trade the honesty, observations, and innovation that we have grown here. The mainstream couldn’t hold my interest the way that our conversations here do.

    About the Skin Finish on Winters…just trying to find time :) Colour appts are busy and they are my absolute favorite thing in the world to do. I’ll get there.

  14. Perhaps is wise to ignore hair, but what about lashes and eyebrows? I´m not talking about myself now, just in general. Facial hair can contrast strongly with the skin or be in harmony, and perhaps it matters when determining season.

  15. Christine, where do you think BeneFit’s “Benetint” fits in? Bright Winter? maybe Bright Spring?

  16. Facial hair is always in harmony, D, but I agree that it can contrast more or less. Usually, I look for a crisply defined brow, because what happens to one feature happens to all the features. I don’t like brows that have no presence or disappear into the face, because then lips, nose, and eyes do too. But I have seen a DW with dark brows, and in TW colours, the blueness and ashness of the brow hair was accentuated (as the blue and grey in the skin were), and the brows looked very severe, too contrasting. Eyelashes, I don’t use, though I must pay more attention to that, I wonder if I’d see anything. They are no doubt part of defining and harmonizing the eye area.

  17. Last I looked at that product, it seems to me I had a BW feeling. It applies pretty sheer, so might cover BSp and TW, I don’t recall much heat in it though for a Sp.

  18. I’m a bright spring and benetint comes out a bit too cool and strong on me (although I am more on the warm side on the season). I tried their Posey tint though, which worked better. Nars Torrid is lovely too. Christine, are you able to recommend any peach gold bronzers or uplighters for bright spring at all?

  19. May I ask something in general about Bright winters undertone?

    How can it be, that it seems to be warmer than Bright Springs undertone, although BSpr is a warm (neutral season) and BW is a cool (neutral) season?

    There is the Strawberry Red of BW and the Pink of BSpr….

    The difference, as far as I can see, is that BWs red includes black and the BSpr pink doesnt, which I do understand, but why does the winter undertone look warmer on the palette in RTYNC?

  20. Speaking of gel blush, I’ve always wondered about Tarte’s stains for bright seasons. I only have the “flush” shade, which is similar to Benetint — probably better for a Bright or even a True Winter. It’s quite cool on me, but I like the way it melts into the skin and doesn’t look like powder blush, which almost always too heavy or grayed on me. (I think there’s a redder shade called Natural Beauty or something.)

  21. The Springs might check out Benefit’s Cha-Cha tint, or maybe the Watts Up (though I can’t make any guarantees about the latter).

  22. I love this article. I am a BW, and am still growing into it. While I love my colors individually, it’s the color equation, I usually have trouble with. In other words, I usually opt for a bright solid top, and a dark bottom. I know it’s playing it safe, and not playful enough. But it’s what I can handle thus far, in the very casual environment I live in. I have not looked into the Kibbie aspect, so maybe that has something to do with it. Or maybe I’m just still evolving.

  23. Kate, Much of what works for T Sp will be find on B Sp, applied with a light hand. I prefer powders, they’re easier to diffuse and control. I like Cover f/x Bronzer f/x in Gold. MAC makes several Mineralize Skin Finish products that could be good. Clinique’s uplighters in peachy gold are good, like Natural, a good colour. This is a product that should go on lightly and very sheer so colours are forgivable. You just don’t want the Autumn orange, muted, earthy, brown, or red group. You want apricots.

    Christine, Two reasons. 1: The colours in RTYNC could have been fussed over endlessly and still not have been 100%. The digital printing process changes the colours very much and only allows certain levels of certain pigments that it can copy with any resemblance to the original. Also, those undertones come from my imagination, they’re what I see as very identifying to that colouring. But for the Neutral Seasons, I could have made a warmer or cooler choice, as you can with all their colours. For BW, I went with the warmer, maybe that’s just what the people I was seeing then looked like to me. And for B Sp, I went with the cooler choice. I could easily have made BW Sugarplum, which would be more in keeping with the purple underlying theme of Winter, and used a much warmer rose for B Sp, in keeping with the peachy tone set for L Sp. Don’t take those colours as gospel. They should not get recorded or used as any kind of measured data.

    Kathy, haven’t swatched those. I do have their powder in Frisky as good for B Sp.

    Betty, It does take time to evolve a style. Just getting the 2 big blocks right is where we start, sounds like you have that part. It’s whatever you can imagine. Each colour can be a blouse, an earring, a watchband, etc. BW isn’t necessarily playful. There is an innocence certainly, but they’re not random. This is still Winter. Some BW feel better in straight up simplicity and drama, or use theatrical touches (hats with veils, for instance) instead of youthful ones. Kibbe, or some consistency of clothing line with body line, is a big part of it. Design, after all, is colour + line. Either one alone is half the image.

  24. thank you!

    I can imagine how difficult it is to print these colors and I totally understood, that you show just an smaller selection of tones for the same reason: to keep the picture flexible.

    I like the dots anyway, helps me much to feel the character of each season…

    Merry Christmas!

  25. Thanks a lot for your help with the bronzers Christine, much appreciated. Betty, not sure if this is helpful at all but I have found pashminas a really easy way of introducing a bit of extra color, as well as jewellery (earrings with brightly colored stones etc). I have also found it a lot easier to find these kinds of items in Bright colors x

  26. Thank you very much for this post! I especially enjoyed your thoughts on bright hair. I am a clear bright spring with that natural light brown hair and tea colored highlights like picture #2. Twice in my lifetime I tried a professional highlight with gold streaks, and I hated the inevitable oxidation to yellow-white. I decided to just wear my hair its natural color until I turned gray. Now that I’m 50, I must color my hair to keep my brightness. I followed a seasonal color theory book that advised me to darken my base and not go lighter to keep my contrast. My colorist suggested demi-color because it allows what’s left of my natural shade to show through–unlike the housepaint effect of permanent color. I love it, but since my hair is deeper I can’t wear the camels and tans I got away with when my hair was tea colored. Your observation that bright hair does turn ashy in the wrong color is spot-on with my experience. In fact, I noticed this the other day and wondered why. Now I know why. Thank you for you blog!

  27. I am fascinated by what you said about Brights’ hair. I’m a Bright Spring (not draped, but pretty sure), and I always hated that question on self-analysis questionnaires about whether it’s dark or light. Um…depends. If I’m wearing white, it looks quite dark. If I’m wearing black or charcoal, suddenly it looks quite light.

    But more to the point, the COLOR is hard to describe/define. Several of us in the Bright Spring group on Facebook have recently commented that, when attempting to find our “hair colors” for clothing, our hair seems to connect better to the *metallics* than to regular matte colors. One of the ladies postulated that it is that inherent brightness – it just seems to work better with “shiny” colors than completely neutral ones, even when the colors are technically right.

  28. Would reverse colour analysis work?

    What I mean is the following, if clear/bright colours look the worst on me, does that point to me being soft? I am trying to determine whether I am a soft autumn or warm autumn, but I think I lean towards soft. Would this mean that bright colours would look worse on me than cool colours, because I do experience exactly that.

  29. You’re always juggling the 3 colour dimensions at the same time. To test yourself in SA and TA, you need a TA colour that contains more red pigment, more gold, and more saturation. To only address one dimension and not the other two is not true to how colour works in clothing or our bodies.

  30. Thank you, thank you so much for your description of their hair color. I am (to the best of my ability to tell) a BW who dressed like a Summer for a long time and I despised my boring medium-brown hair, kept it highlighted gold and copper and, when I stopped doing the highlights, wished it would just pick a side, real dark brown or blonde, instead of hanging out in the middle. Reading your praise of mysterious glassy Earl-Grey-with-lemon hair…it made me sit up. That was a few weeks ago, and now for the first time in my life I love my hair the color God made it – perfect for my snow-in-sunlight coloring.

  31. Yea I’m one of those brights who messed with there hair they just Dont make dyes my color/like my hair. Now I get to wait for it to grow out. So please Dont dye your hair fellow brights

  32. Jackie’s color is similar to mine. The eyeshadow quad and bright gloss are gorgeous! She has gorgeous skin, do you know the blush, glow products (if used) and

    what foundation, powder? Or is her skin naturally incredible? Wow!

  33. Her skin is naturally like that! She has very little make up on except for some lipgloss and Eye make up. Jackie is an interesting bright winter, and belongs to a group whose skin appears a little smoky and could be confused with soft summer.

  34. Hi, about Eva Green. Looking at the photo of the young Eva Green, I think her colors look a lot like her mother’s, the lady on the photo, the actrice Marlène Jobert. (Marlène Jobert does have a lot of natural freckles, if that helps) It so happens that in the french translation of Kate Jackson’s « Color me beautiful », Marlène Jobert is described as an Autumn. (A Warm Autumn I suppose) What do you make of it ? And what about Elsa Lunghini, Eva Green’s first cousin, a french singer ? A Soft Autumn ?
    It so happened that when I was little, everybody said I looked like Marlène Jobert, and when I was a teenager, that I looked like her niece, Elsa Lunghini (have a look an google image) . Having Kate Jackson’s « Color me beautiful » in French, I assumed that I was an Autumn… I now think I might be a soft Autumn deep, but my hair looks a lot like Annie’s But, just to see what you make of it all.

  35. That is Eva Green’s mother? Wow, genetics are amazing, no? Marlene’s colouring is uncommon enough that I wouldn’t even guess what would happen when drapes are under that face. She could be very unpredictable. Sure, she has Autumn attributes, but for me, those ways of thinking about colour do not apply. I never find they have any bearing with real human beings. Freckles are irrelevant, you see them in every single Season, True and Neutral. Elsa is really amazing looking too. I guess everyone is when you really look at them. She also has Autumn attributes, but so do many people who do not test as having any Autumn. Elsa could be any of the 12 Seasons and it wouldn’t really surprise me …though she does appear cooler than she is warm, I suppose. Very good images, thank you.

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