How to Choose Eyeshadow for Your Eye Colour

How to Choose Eyeshadow for Your Eye Colour

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In this post, I explain 3 ways to use your 12 Season colour palette to choose colours in eyeshadow that enhance eye colour and flatter skin tone at the same time. In the video, I talk about why using complementary colours to intensify eye colour works best they come from your Season palette, a formula that’s pre-configured to work for all your colour choices.

Thank you to C. who sent in a great question and got me thinking about this topic:

I have blue-gray eyes and wearing the blue colors in my fan really makes my iris color pop… I wear the Ego eye shadow from your store with my beautiful blues.

However, I’ve been studying makeup theory and application this past week and all the advice out there says to use orange and terra cotta eye shadow to make the blue color of my iris stand out. Problem is — those colors aren’t in my fan and they certainly are too warm to go with my underlying skin tone, regardless of what they’re doing to my eyes.


The names Ego and After Dark are linked to their pages in the 12 Blueprints Store, or may be found in the store’s in the Soft Summer and True Autumn collections, respectively.

In her last sentence, C. brilliantly answered her own question. Taking one feature out of context of the whole is not the way to harmonious (everything looks great together) beauty.

We are not floating eyes, any more than a garden is floating flowers. Eyes need a framework to be effective and part of a whole picture. We want the canvas of the face to meet and the bone structure to support the eyes. Therefore, skin matters as much as eyes.



The video is also here on YouTube.

3 ways to enhance eye colour:

1. Repeat the natural colours. Ego does a beautiful job of this for the blue-greens in Soft Summer eyes. The palette knows our real colours better than we know them ourselves. Do this if the colour makes sense. Winter eyes can contain a lot of strong yellow, not an easy choice for the skin as a cosmetic, but superb as an element in a print.

2. Warm to cool contrast in your Season. This works especially well for Neutral Seasons to take advantage of the warm to cool ranges in these types of colouring. One example is once again Soft Summer’s Ego for Soft Summers with more warmth in the eye colours. Ego’s coolness results in eyes that seem even richer and warmer, an amazing contrast with cool skin and clothing, an impression that is surprising, original, and still perfectly put together.

A second example is in Bright Winter with visible yellow in their dark brown eyes. Warm or yellow-brown eyeliner would be a less-than-best choice. Purple-brown, OTOH, is fabulous, enhancing the skin and making the eyes glow. Quite fabulous next to cool skin or hair colour.

3. Complementary colours. Go to this complementary colour generator. Choose a colour in the top row to the right of the wheel, and in the second row next to Choose a Harmony, click Complementary. Play with it a bit. Watch the colour blocks beneath the wheel and then watch the strip along the left edge of it as they change real time.

Choose a colour on the wheel that seems close to your eye colour. Don’t worry about being too exact, we are all unlikely to guesstimate with perfect accuracy.

You might also try sampling the eye colours from a photograph, as I did for the first three in the chart below. We each have many eye colours and use clothing and cosmetics to enhance all of them.

How to Choose Eyeshadow for Your Eye Colour

Using The Complimentary Colour Chart

1.  True Spring with light yellow green eyes.

Could this beauty of a purple be a reminder of why Springs look so phenomenal when they wear colour?

Perhaps unlikely to be worn as cosmetics, but spectacular in an ensemble. Choose the colour in your Season palette that is closest and head to the stores for a scarf, earrings, or anywhere else you can find it.

2. True Summer with gray-green eyes.

And could this explain why wardrobe neutrals look so great on Summers? This colour could serve as eyeshadow any day.

3. True Autumn with rust in the eyes.

Well, would you look at that? The complementary green is close to the colour of the After Dark eyeshadow accent.

4. True Winter and a green.

For this one, I used an approximate of the green drapes that energize the eyes and entire appearance, instead of sampling from a photograph.

Voila, complement. Not an eyeshadow for most of us, but in blush or lipstick? Exciting eyes and exciting mouth.

Learn your colours

Stop searching for “Who am I?” and move on to “What are the magic tricks I already have?”

I promise you, they are amazing. Your Season palette has worked out all the secrets.



2 Thoughts on How to Choose Eyeshadow for Your Eye Colour

  • Leah

    Interesting post. I, too, have found the standard “peach (or brown) eyeshadow for blue eyes” advice to be troublesome when applied to my own blue-gray eyes. Not only does it not take into consideration skin tone, but I think it greatly oversimplifies eye color. There are so many variations of blue eyes! Peach probably does look good on some blue eyes, but certainly not all. The advice in those articles is always way too generic to be useful.

  • Carol Dubs

    The original Carol here. Christine, thanks for your kind email responses to me earlier and this blog post. Yes, pulling from the colors of my own body works better than the most recent fashion trend or formula. BTW, after my original question to Christine, I went to the 12 Blueprints Store and purchased the Soft Summer eyeshadow palette. I’ve been experimenting with it and love the looks it produces. The SS eye shadow colors are all neutrals or neutrals with a hint of a color (such as the SS lavender which I understand is an underlying basic color in all SS skin tones). The result enhances my eye in a way that seems more natural than clearly defined colors. Looking briefly at the other seasons in the 12 B Store, I see that the eye shadow colors there are also neutrals.

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